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June 24, 2015 — A week of worry

I received the phone call one week ago, about five minutes away from my destination.

“I need you to get your sister on the phone. Your brother is going into surgery. Now.”

My sister-in-law didn’t have much time to talk; she was driving to a well-reknowned cardiac center where my brother was being flown, such was the nature of the emergency.

He had collapsed two days before while coming out of a store on a hot day. He was hospitalized for observation for two days until the pain in his chest intensified.

I texted my sister, a medical doctor who has turned to the phone text as her main mode of communication, much like many teens these days. She was on a hospital call with her regular practice, but I wouldn’t get to know that until I got a response text at 5 a.m. with the result: my brother was out of the operating theater. He had a cardiac episode which is usually fatal, but with quick work by the surgeons, he now has a second life.

I visited him this afternoon in the hospital. He will be out soon, but will have to rest for several weeks while the sutures and stitches heal up.

Since the deaths of my parents, I was hoping that there would be a period of time when we, as a family, wouldn’t have to have many health crises to worry about. Indeed, our family has been pretty fortunate when it comes to our health histories. But the near-death experience of my brother has shaken me to my core. When will my time come? What if my work on this earth is not yet finished? What more can I do?

I figure that the best thing to do is not to worry and fret and become paralyzed by fear. Instead, a friend of mine who is a certified life coach gave me an interesting answer the other day:

When we let go of our need to control or to understand the “why,” we allow more space for creativity, peace, opportunity, and dancing in the moment. If we go with our intuition and commit to make the most of the situations that arise, we learn to be fully present creators. Often, when we commit to achieving something bigger—something beyond our knowing or what we have done before—we are not sure how to create it. The “how” is not up to us. We must simply listen to intuition, decide, take action and watch how things unfold. Often, opportunities arise that we never could have imagined. (source: megantaylormorrison.com)

Very prescient, Megan. Thank you.

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